See How To Manage Diabetes During Pregnancy


Most Women develop diabetes during pregnancy. However the information on this page is for women who had diabetes before pregnancy and how they can live healthy during pregnancy. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. If you have diabetes, there’s no reason that you can’t have a healthy and successful pregnancy and deliver a healthy baby. What it does mean is that you will probably have to work closely with your doctor and other healthcare professionals to ensure you manage your diabetes well during your pregnancy.

High blood sugar levels are harmful to the mother and her fetus. Experts advise diabetics to maintain blood sugar level close to normal range for 2 to 3 months before planning for pregnancy. Managing blood sugar close to normal before and during pregnancy helps to protect the health of mother and the baby.

Diabetes During pregnancy

While you may take good care of yourself already, pregnancy is a time when you need to take even more care. It is very important for your health and for your baby’s health that your blood sugar levels are kept stable.

The ideal blood sugar level is 4.0 – 5.5 mmol/L when fasting (before meals), and less than 7.0 mmol/L two hours after a meal.

When you are pregnant, there is a chance that some of the potential complications of diabetes, like eye disease and kidney disease, may develop. You will need your doctors to keep an eye on this. There is also a risk of developing pre-eclampsia, in which your blood pressure rises, which can cause problems for the baby.

Babies born to women with diabetes face risks like being born larger than average, or with a birth defect. They may also be born prematurely or even stillborn.

These risks are greatly reduced if you keep your blood sugars under good control.

What can i do keep me healthy during pregnancy


Seeing your doctor for pre-pregnancy planning is an important step in ensuring the best outcome for you and your baby. You have a pre-existing condition, so you can plan ahead and discuss with your doctor what you need to do before you become pregnant, and what you can do to manage your diabetes during pregnancy. There is a lot you can do:

  • start taking folate when you are thinking about becoming pregnant
  • see your doctors early and often
  • monitor your blood sugar levels closely
  • get advice about what to eat, and follow it
  • avoid alcoholsmoking and drugs
  • review all your medications with your doctors regularly
  • make sure all your vaccinations are up to date
  • aim for a healthy weight.

Risk Of not Taking Proper Care of Yourself During Pregnancy May Include:

  • having a birth defect;
  • being born prematurely;
  • weighing too much or too little;
  • having jaundice; or
  • having dangerously low blood sugar levels after birth.

You yourself have an increased risk of having a miscarriage or of developing high blood pressure during the pregnancy. However, you can minimise these risks by planning ahead and gaining the best possible control of your blood sugar at the time of conception and throughout the first 2 months of pregnancy.

If you have type 2 diabetes and are taking tablets to help control your blood sugar (oral hypoglycaemic medication), you can plan ahead and, if appropriate, switch to taking insulin instead, before you become pregnant. (Doctors usually recommend taking insulin instead of oral hypoglycaemic medication during pregnancy, as the oral medications are not known to be safe for the unborn baby.)

If you have high blood pressure (hypertension) now is the time to get your blood pressure under control using medications that are safe to continue once you are pregnant.

You may need to stop taking some medications, such as certain cholesterol-lowering medicines, while you are pregnant — check with your doctor.

Now is also the time to start taking a folate supplement. This is important for all women planning a pregnancy, as the fetus needs adequate levels of folate during the first few weeks (when you may not even know you are pregnant) for normal development of the nervous system. Your doctor can advise you about supplements.

YOU CAN ALSO CHOOSE TO BUY OUR PRODUCTS “DIABETES WELLNESS PACK” TO REVERSE YOU HEALTH. PEOPLE LIVING WITH DIABETES HAVE HAD WONDERFUL BREAKTHROUGH WITH THESE PRODUCTS. I PROMISE YOU WONT REGRET IT. TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCT AND MAKE YOUR ORDER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Foods to avoid

Avoiding foods that may raise blood sugar levels is essential if a person is following a gestational diabetes diet.

Avoiding sugary foods

selection of sugary foods and drinks

Avoiding sugary food and drink is recommended to help limit the impact of gestational diabetes.

Blood sugar levels are raised when people eat sugary foods, particularly those that are refined and processed. Women with gestational diabetes are advised to avoid or limit sugary foods, as much as possible.

Sugary foods to avoid include:

  • cakes
  • biscuits
  • sweets
  • puddings
  • soda
  • fruit juice with added sugar

Avoiding very starchy foods

Starchy foods are high in carbohydrates and have a bigger impact on our blood sugar, so it is important to eat them only in small portions. Some very starchy foods are best avoided or limited. These include:

  • white potatoes
  • white bread
  • white rice
  • white pasta

Avoiding hidden sugars and carbohydrates

Some foods are not obviously sources of sugar or carbohydrate, but they may still contain unhealthful levels of both of these food types. Examples of these include:

  • highly processed foods
  • some condiments, such as dressings and ketchup
  • fast foods
  • alcohol

Milk and fruits contain natural sugars and can be enjoyed in moderation

Foods to eat

Following a healthful diet is important during pregnancy, and particularly so if a woman develops gestational diabetes.

High blood sugar levels may be harmful to the woman and the growing fetus. To help manage blood sugar levels, it is important to monitor how many, what type, and how often carbohydratesare consumed. Keeping a food diary may make this easier.

Monitoring carbohydrates

Complex carbs

Eating complex carbs rather than simple carbs is recommended.

Spacing meals and snacks containing carbohydrates evenly throughout the day can help avoid spikes in blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association recommend that women with gestational diabetes should eat three small-to-moderate meals and two to four snacks per day.

Other ways to help regulate blood sugar include:

  • avoiding eating too many carbohydrates at one time
  • sticking to complex carbohydrates that are high in fiber
  • combining carbohydrates with protein or healthy fat
  • not skipping meals
  • eating a protein-rich and fibrous carbohydrate breakfast

Eating low glycemic index foods

Eating foods that have a low glycemic load is another crucial factor in a gestational diabetes diet.

The glycemic load is calculated by multiplying the grams of carbohydrate in a serving of a particular type of food by that food’s glycemic index (GI). This number gives a more accurate picture of a food’s real impact on blood sugar.

Foods with a low glycemic load are broken down more slowly than simple carbohydrates, which are typically considered high GI foods.

A glycemic load of 10 or below is considered low and is ideal for those with gestational diabetes who are trying to manage blood sugar.

Low glycemic load foods to eat include:

  • 100 percent wholegrain breads and cereals
  • non-starchy vegetables
  • some starchy vegetables, such as peas and carrots
  • some fruit, such as apples, oranges, grapefruit, peaches, and pears
  • beans
  • lentils
  • chickpeas

All of these low GI foods release sugar into the blood slowly, helping to keep blood sugar levels stable.

Eating more protein

Eating protein alongside carbohydrates, or choosing carbohydrates that also have protein in them, helps to balance blood sugar levels. Women with gestational diabetes should try to eat lean, protein-rich foods, such as:

  • fish, chicken, and turkey
  • eggs
  • tofu
  • beans
  • nuts
  • seeds
  • quinoa
  • legumes

Choosing unsaturated fats

Unsaturated fats are also part of any healthful diet. Examples of unsaturated fats include:

  • olive oil
  • peanut oil
  • avocado
  • most nuts and seeds
  • salmon
  • sardines
  • tuna
  • chia seeds

Delivery and birth

You should plan the birth of your baby together with your doctor and midwife. You may be advised to have a caesarean delivery. You might be advised to have a drip with sugar and insulin while in labour. You may be advised to have your baby a little early or it may decide to arrive early on its own. Keeping your blood sugars under good control gives you the best chance of reaching full term.

Once born, your baby will be monitored closely, and may have blood tests regularly. This is to test for low sugar levels, not diabetes. Your baby may need to go to the special care nursery for a day or two.

You should be able to breastfeed your baby. Having diabetes won’t affect your breast-feeding, and insulin is not harmful to the baby. Talk to your midwife or lactation consultant if you have any concerns. You can also call the Australian Breastfeeding Association on 1800 686 268.

If you have diabetes, there is a slight chance your baby will develop diabetes too. But it is far more likely that they will not.

YOU CAN ALSO CHOOSE TO BUY OUR PRODUCTS “DIABETES WELLNESS PACK” TO REVERSE YOU HEALTH. PEOPLE LIVING WITH DIABETES HAVE HAD WONDERFUL BREAKTHROUGH WITH THESE PRODUCTS. I PROMISE YOU WONT REGRET IT. TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCT AND MAKE YOUR ORDER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Anasthesia

Ann is passionate about helping patients with chronic conditions manage their diseases. She is dedicated to helping people in their journey to achieving good health in the most natural an affordable way possible. She believes that educating people is the best way to improve their general health

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *